Blog

A Quick Look at charset Usage

I recently took a sample from my list of bookmarks and checked to see whether or not people were using a charset in their documents. After seeing the results I thought maybe a quick overview of what a charset is may be in order. I also took into consideration the different types of charsets available to designers and developers and touched on the advantages and disadvantages of the two most common.

Posted: September 18, 2006

Linux and Web Development Part 2

It has been over two months since my last writeup about using Linux for Web development. I thought now would be a good time to revisit that subject and write a bit about my findings after using the new operating system for a little while.

Posted: September 11, 2006

Partial Versus Full RSS Feeds

There are lots of pros and cons to offering a partial or full content RSS feed. I’ve recently decided to offer partial feeds in hopes of preventing content scraping. While that can solve a single problem, it may start a few more.

Posted: September 04, 2006

Catching Up on the Mobile Web

I know I’m not the first to say that the mobile Web is becoming more advanced all the time. There have been countless articles written on the subject of designing for the mobile web and many of them have some really innovative and exciting suggestions. What lies beneath all the great speculation is the fact that standards for the mobile Web is hardly existent. If you thought designing a cross compatible site for the desktop was a challenge, wait until you work with handhelds.

Posted: August 28, 2006

Don’t Make Me Think – Book Review

Aug 21, 2006 by Jonathan Christopher product ★★★★★ Usability is a subject, for one reason or another, that is often avoided by designers and developers. It is something that can’t be taught, or achieved by following a certain syntax, so many times it is looked at as an obstacle. In reality, it has a lot […]

Posted: August 21, 2006

Beginning to Style Your RSS Feed

If you’re anything like me, RSS has completely changed the way you browse the Web. It has become much easier to manage the abundance of content I want to read across the net; mostly due to RSS. No longer must I make my way down a list of bookmarks, hoping to find an update here and there.

Posted: August 14, 2006

Book Review: Sams JavaScript

If you haven’t ever come across any of the books in the Sams Teach Yourself <Insert Technology> in 24 Hours, the idea behind them is this: Each chapter can be read in one hour, and there are 24 chapters in the book. Therefore you can theoretically complete the book in a total of 24 hours. While some people may be misled into thinking that they’ll learn what they want in a day, it’s really just a clever gimmick — and for the most part, it works.

Posted: August 07, 2006

Current Events: IE7 and Google

Catching up on some recent changes to Internet Explorer and a new Google search which takes accessibility into account with search results.

Posted: July 31, 2006

Calendar Semantics: Table or List

Many times, when a developer first begins to use proper HTML and CSS for markup and style, he or she has a tendency to disown tables and avoid their use at all cost. While thinking that way can allow a developer to discover many creative ways of using the newfound power of CSS, it can put someone at a severe disadvantage.

Posted: July 24, 2006

Introducing MBN DuoTone Headings

One thing that JavaScript is absolutely great for is enhancing the average browsing experience for your user. On the other hand, requiring the presence of JavaScript compatibility can be an utter disaster. In my opinion, JavaScript is great for visual or functional enhancements, but those features should not be necessary to make proper use of any particular document. If a user doesn’t arrive equipped with the ability to run JavaScript, they shouldn’t know they’re missing out on anything.

Posted: July 15, 2006